How Should I Be? – Advice for the sovereign individual on leadership | Cormac mac Airt

Many people study today’s paradigm in depth and have a good working knowledge of our situational landscape.  However, when we pause to consider solutions we often struggle to articulate what it will take to assemble an alternative course that upholds the moral and reasonable high ground.  If we harken back in time to the Celtic Christian concepts of our Founders, we have only the recollection of their Protestant philosophical roots to draw upon which was sufficient for the tyranny of their time where right and wrong, identity, and purpose was more clear cut.  Today after nearly a century of psychological operations upon the people, the very identity of the People is marred and our course and history is less clear.  Our understanding of the paradigm may be clear but who and what we are on both an individual and collective level is more difficult to grasp.

In this we find it more necessary to delve deeper into our roots for a restoration of that once majestic core identity woven into our human potential.  Thus out of the annals of the most ancient history, come whispers of what the Founders may have at one time known and protected carefully…via a promise of anonymity.   It’s time to remove that anonymity and uncloak what was protected for a new generation in dire need of that small facet of their history.  At this moment the direct provenance is less important to explain than to spend the effort to introduce the content and set the stage for the full restoration of identity.  Through old Laconia, a voice calls you to listen first to the words of the 2nd century Old Irish High King Cormac mac Airt as he spoke to his son Cairbre on the eve of his stepping down from the leadership of Ireland (Eire); his son to step up to that leadership, untried but conscientious of the degree of wisdom he would find needed.  Those words are about leadership and what it takes to be.

In terms of ancient Celtic culture the formulation of Being for the sovereign individual, occurs over many years and with highly detailed training via exposure to knowledge passed down generation after generation.  The words of Cormac comprises not only his own hard earned wisdom over the time of his life, but also that of all leaders and scholars of leadership of every manner and kind who went before him.  This is part of the heritage that was closely guarded by our Founders and in this time of confused identity, is most necessary to resurrect.  The following is but one small excerpt of the advice Cormac gave to his son.  It’s a starting point, not the whole of your inheritance.

QUOTE from the book The Counsels of Cormac: An Ancient Irish Guide to Leadership – A New Translation from the Original Old Irish by Thomas Cleary:

A question, said Cairbre:  How should I be?

That’s easy, said Cormac

Be intelligent to the intelligent, so no one may dupe you by means of intelligence.

Be proud to the proud, so no one may be over you causing you to quiver.

Be humble to the humble, so your will may be done.

Be talkative to the talkative, so you may be respected.

Be silent with the silent when listening to information.

Be hard to the hard, so no one treats you with contempt.

Be soft with the soft, so everyone doesn’t attack.

Cormac also said this: 

One is intelligent until one sells one’s inheritance.

One is foolish until one acquires land.

One is friend until it comes to debt.

One is a judge until it comes to children.

One is slothful until getting married.

One is virile until becoming religious.

One is respected until being defeated.

One is hospitable until refusing.

One is a nomad until homesteading.

One is a servant until one resides in one’s own abode.

One is sound of mind until becoming drunk.

One is sensible until getting enraged.

One is well-behaved until committing sexual misconduct.

One is calm until fostering children.

One is confident until quarreling.

One is free until being denounced.

One is cheerful until misfortune occurs.

One is bold until refused.

One is a pedestrian until one is a charioteer.

All music is noble through the harp.

One who is prosperous is dignified.

One who is wretched is unseemly.

The sweetest sleep is lying together.

The sweetest ale is the first drink.

The sweetest music is music in the dark.

The sweetest person is the worthy one.

A young person who is tractable, humble, obedient, earnest in conscience and confession, will be beloved in youth, esteemed in old age, true in his word, noble in his appearance, high even if lowly, mature though youthful; his destiny with God and humanity will be good.

— This was one small bit of the advice that Cormac gave his son, and it was written down for not only him, but for all people as everyone is sovereign…you were created equal; you are a leader.  Your Being is to be in good standing.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” — The Declaration of Independence.  Jul 4, 2015
Celtic wisdom is most often given in metaphor.  Every piece embodies a subject of knowledge.  It paints a concept landscape.  The book quoted above contains 50 pages of the wisdom of Cormac on leadership.  For the individual serious about reconstructing the character of our heritage, it is this author’s opinion that the content’s of the advice Cormac gave to his son is imperative to learn and understand.  For this reason I strongly recommend the book from which this excerpt comes.  Buy two copies and give one away.   Hard copy can be found on Amazon.com
FiOs.  — Old Irish (Berla Feini:  Vision, Memory, Dream); modern Irish: Knowledge.
From wikipedia can be read more about Cormac mac Airt and his life.
Excerpt:

Cormac mac Airt (son of Art), also known as Cormac ua Cuinn (grandson of Conn) or Cormac Ulfada (long beard), was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He is probably the most famous of the ancient High Kings, and may have been an authentic historical figure, although many legends have attached themselves to him, and his reign is variously dated as early as the 2nd century and as late as the 4th. He is said to have ruled from Tara, the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, for forty years, and under his rule Tara flourished. He was famous for his wise, true, and generous judgments. In the Annals of Clonmacnoise, translated in 1627, he is described as:

“absolutely the best king that ever reigned in Ireland before himself…wise learned, valiant and mild, not given causelessly to be bloody as many of his ancestors were, he reigned majestically and magnificently”.

The hero Fionn mac Cumhaill is supposed to have lived in Cormac’s time, and most of the stories of the Fenian Cycle are set during his reign.

 

Cyrellys:  For the ones who have stayed in this nation to fight the good fight; who have not given up hope. You are in the finest tradition of the ancients who left for you this trail of various bread crumbs to your inheritance; your identity.  It was for you this nation was created, not the statists, corporatists, or Illumines.  You are ROAR.

ROAR: that of an ancient and irrevocable order of things; an undeniable power drawn from the Source.

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